Visit Cracow

Dodane: 03-06-2016 14:25
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Crakow uprising

The Kraków Uprising of February 1846 was an attempt, led by Polish insurgents such as Jan Tyssowski and Edward Dembowski, to incite a fight for national independence. The uprising was centered on the city of Kraków, the capital of a small state of Free City of Kraków. It was directed at the powers that partitioned Poland, in particular, the nearby Austrian Empire. The uprising lasted about nine days, and ended with Austrian victory.

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krak%C3%B3w_Uprising


Winding films in Cracow

Each of the tourists who visits a city, he would like to have some memento of their trip, held. Therefore, in Krakow there is no shortage of different stalls and souvenir outlets. You can also buy postcards of Krakow, which are sent from the city to family and friends, and can be pasted into a family album, where the custom documentation for family outings reigns in our family. In Krakow, as in any other tourist city, you can also take pictures. We only have to remember not to remove the camera in locations where taking pictures is prohibited. Currently, very often curly films documenting the visits to various places of historic buildings.


Etymology of Vistula name

The name was first recorded by Pomponius Mela in a.d. 40 and by Pliny in a.d. 77 in his Natural History. Mela names the river Vistula (3.33), Pliny uses Vistla (4.81, 4.97, 4.100). The root of the name Vistula is Indo-European *u?eis- ?to ooze, flow slowly? (cf. Sanskrit ?????? / ave?an ?they flowed?, Old Norse veisa ?slime?) and is found in many European rivernames (e.g. Weser, Viesinta).2 The diminutive endings -ila, -ula, were used in many Indo-European languages, including Latin (see Ursula).

In writing about the Vistula River and its peoples, Ptolemy uses the Greek spelling Ouistoula. Other ancient sources spell it Istula. Ammianus Marcellinus refers to the Bisula (Book 22), note the lack the -t-. Jordanes (Getica 5 & 17) uses Viscla while the Anglo-Saxon poem Widsith refers to it as the Wistla.3 12th-century Polish chronicler Wincenty Kadłubek Latinised the rivername as Vandalus, a form presumably influenced by Lithuanian vandu? ?water?, while Jan Długosz in his Annales seu cronicae incliti regni Poloniae called the Vistula ?white waters? (Alba aqua), perhaps referring to the White Little Vistula (Biała Wisełka): ?a nationibus orientalibus Polonis vicinis, ob aquae candorem Alba aqua ... nominatur.?

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vistula



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